Category: Part II

10: Making Connections

Earlier (See cognitive student strategies 5 and 6), we explored how background and prior knowledge are critical if students are to make sense of the new material they encounter.  In those strategy descriptions, we emphasized what students and teachers can do before reading a text to either build appropriate new knowledge or to activate the […]

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11: Summarizing

Quick!  Summarize an article you read from the morning newspaper.  Be careful; this is trickier than it appears.  To complete this task, you might return to the article, reread it, and identify only the most important points.  If you took this approach, you were summarizing.  Another approach is to attempt to recall the article from […]

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12: Visualizing

In cognitive student strategy 4, Jason Lefevre told us about an elegant fishing story, The River Runs Through It (Maclean, 1976).  In that novella, the author describes the Big Blackfoot River. The straight line on the map also suggests its glacial origins; it has no meandering valley, and its few farms are mostly on its […]

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13: Asking and Making Clarifications

Clarification requires readers to recall earlier predictions and points of confusion in critical evaluation of what the reader has encountered (Palincsar & Brown, 1984).  Students might think of clarification as a refining process by which understanding is enhanced.  To make a clarification, the reader must recall an earlier prediction (or a point of confusion) and […]

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References

Allbritton, D. (2004).  Strategic production of predictive inferences during comprehension. Discourse Processes, 38, 309-322.Alvermann, D. E., & Phelps, S. (2005). Content reading and literacy: Succeeding in today’s classrooms (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education. Anderson. R. C. (2004).  Role of the reader’s schema in comprehension, learning, and memory.  In R. B. Ruddell & N. J. […]

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