Category: Part III

13: Shared Reading

Sharing connotes, at times, a limited amount of something which must be divided up into smaller quantities.  One piece of cake and two children who want dessert calls for sharing.  At other times, sharing connotes an experience that is enriched when more than one person participates in it.  A movie is more fun, more memorable, […]

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14:Think Alouds and Models

Thinking, and by extension, comprehension is an invisible process.  Because we can’t see or hear actual thinking, it is a kind of mystery to students how to perform certain cognitive processes.  We can observe the products of thinking—an essay, a speech, a response to a question, and so forth—but the processes themselves are locked in […]

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17:Reciprocal Teaching

Paulo Freire (1970) proposed that the roles of teachers and students are not as clearly demarcated as we educators sometimes believe. Feire’s book often confounds readers for a variety of reasons; it was written in a time and place and about a segment of the world’s population about which teachers in western classrooms today understandably […]

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18:KWL

The KWL structure (Ogle, 1986) is intuitively appealing, and it is instructionally elegant.  It proceeds at the outset from the idea that students know something and that what students already know can help them construct new understanding. New understanding grounded firmly in previous learning is far more likely to stick and become the foundation for […]

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Cliffhanger

The cliffhanger is most often associated with television series when one season ends with some shocking event that leaves the viewer wondering what happened.  It is a plot device that begs the viewer (or, in our case, the reader) to predict what is going to happen next.  If you are in our generation, you will […]

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